San Francisco Bay Startups: Good and Bad Branding

With today’s fierce competition for startups in the San Francisco Bay area, it’s important for new companies to establish a brand early. A good brand can easily help a startup make it big, and a bad one can just as easily kill it. What makes a good brand? Good branding goes beyond just an attractive logo and catchy name. It’s important for startups to be consistent in all of their branding, and take every opportunity to convey their brand’s image. Everything a company does or says should reflect the brand, creating brand unity. A brand’s message should be unique and fresh, communicating regularly with its audience in a distinctive voice. Example: Airbnb San Francisco-based startup, Airbnb, has become a go-to app for travelers and vacationers looking for an affordable place to stay. The app provides rooms and guest houses all over the world that are available to rent by the night. Airbnb uses several different social media platforms to spread their message and convey their brand. Their Facebook page is updated every few days with photos and videos related to travel and hot vacation spots, as well as interviews with Airbnb hosts. Their Twitter page shares Tweets from app users …

SF-Based StartupStats Helps Investors Find the Most Talked About Startups

San Francisco-based entrepreneur, Nick O’Neill, is known in business circles for founding SocialTimes, a news website that reports on all things social media, from Facebook news to Twitter trends and everything in between. The site launched in 2007 as AllFacebook, and in 2010, O’Neill sold it to WebMedia Brands. Recently O’Neill started a new project designed to connect investors with the hottest startups. StartupStats was launched in 2012 and has been adding new features ever since. The site matches investors with new startups by analyzing data from AngelList and Twitter to determine which startups are getting the most attention. This data is used to generate a rating called a “StartupScore,” which shows how many AngelList investors are following a particular startup, and how many Twitter users are linking back to it. Investors who have joined StartupStats have found the service to be a good indicator of which startups will be funded soon. “It surfaces upcoming startups earlier in the cycle and they can get earlier access, ideally,” O’Neil told Business Insider. “Now, whether or not they’re going to turn out to be legitimate companies is a whole other thing, but we’re at least beginning to see that our system surfaces …

San Francisco’s Found Conference Proved Dog Tech is Big Business

Technology has gone to the dogs. In March, startup CEOs gathered at Digital Garage in San Francisco for Found, the first ever dog tech conference. The event was hosted by Pack, a local startup that provides a social network for dogs and their owners. Pack co-founder and CEO, Megan Casey, said the purpose of the conference was to discuss the growing industry of technology for dog owners. “We wanted to get a group of fellow dog startups that see the same type of opportunity and solutions together into one room to say this isn’t an underdog issue, this is something that’s actually a really big market,” she said. Guest speakers at Found included Aaron Easterly, CEO of Rover, a service that connects dog owners with dog sitters in over 10,000 US cities. Easterly discussed the trends he feels are driving pet tech, including an increased demand for pet products and the lower cost of tech startups. “When you have an increase in demand and an increase in supply, you get an explosion in pet tech,” he explained. Easterly said he sees a huge undeserved market in dog technology, and urged fellow startups to think big. “Don’t get overly stuck on …